Emily Culottes, Take 1

After conquering a lined jacket (well nearly..) I was ready to take on pants.  How hard could it be?

Fabric

 

Basic grey cotton drill from Lincraft.  Pocket bags with left over poplin from a pleated top clone (not blogged).

Pattern

Emily-Culottes-Product-Hero-509x756

Emily Culottes from Itch to Stitch.  I had a powerful desire to make the box pleat version, despite Mum’s doubtful tone.

Adaptations

Naturally, I didn’t use the pattern as is:

  • There were some inconsistencies with the stated sizes and the actual pattern measured size.
    According to the pattern notes, I would just fit into the largest size, and possibly have to create more room around the hips with an “athletic” butt adjustment.  However when measuring the pattern pieces, I actually took in the waist by a good 2 inches, and there was ample room around the hips.
  • The crotch curve was a U shape – the front was the same height and depth as the back.  I was alert to this, having read Cation’s series on trouser fitting.  I have a sway back and an “athletic” butt – so I need much more length in the back curve than the front.
    After comparing the crotch curve to a RTW pair of trousers that fit comfortably, I took more than 6cm (about 2.5″) off the width of the front crotch curve, and about 1″ off the height at the front.
  • I added about 1″ in height to the centre back.
  • I added about 1″ to the “short” length of the culottes so they would hit me just below the knee.

Techniques

Sorry – can’t be bothered with in progress photos!

  • Flat felled seams – I couldn’t get this working with the 1cm (3/8″) seam allowance as per the pattern, so increased the seam width to 1.5cm (5/8″).  Still no issues with the overall width of the culottes, even though this took another 2cm (6/8″) off the overall circumference.
  • Invisible zip – turned out to be a disaster and I converted to a lapped zip (yes, that’s how bad it was at being invisible)
  • Single Welt pockets – the method described in the pattern instructions was incomprehensible.  This was nothing like the method shown on the Great British Sewing Bee!
    I ended up ripping up the pieces and following the WorkRoom Social tutorial.
  • Curved waistband – hooray no more bagging at the centre back!  I used fusible interfacing for both front and back waistband pieces.

Results

Mixed results.  Here’s a photo fresh off the sewing machine with the waistband sitting nicely on my waistline and the box pleat nice and crisp.

image1

Unfortunately, the cotton drill relaxes after 30mins of wear – even the carefully fused-on-both-sides waistband.  So instead of sitting on my waist, the culottes sag downwards, the inseam hangs a good 3″ below my actual crotch, and the box pleat looks baggy.

I was always using this as my first attempt to get my personal crotch curve fitting requirements sorted, so it has still been a useful exercise.

The culottes are not quite a wadder, but are definitely only used around the house.

Planned adaptations for next time:

  • keep tinkering with the crotch curve
  • Replace the side zip with a front fly
  • Get rid of the box pleats!

Links

 

Itch to Stitch

Pattern Review

WorkRoom Social Single Welt Pocket tutorial

Cation Design’s Trouser Fitting Posts: Part 1  Part 2

 

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